Category Archives: Technology Know-how

Digital Printing

THE BENEFITS OF DIGITAL PRINTING

This month we are putting the spotlight on digital printing. Within the last few years, technical advancements in digital printing has seen the quality and control of digitally printed jobs stand toe to toe with the traditional offset printed projects.

In the past when choosing to digitally print your project as apposed to offset print, you would be controlled by limitations such as paper stocks and thickness, quality on the printed image, cost, size of the worksheet and the inability to apply finishing processes to the printed piece. All of these, and more, are now diminished with today’s digital print technology.

Of course there are benefits limitations to both print processes, and thankfully our knowledgeable staff at TPH can help guide you to which best suits your needs. For example, for high volume jobs offset printing will make your unit cost more effective. The larger sheet sizes allow us to ‘gang’ up many jobs, but this is nothing new really. At a later date we will walk you through more benefits of offset printing. For now however, we’d like to put a spotlight on digital print and its benefits. It may give you more of an insight into digital printing and help guide you which process is best for your next job.

Short turnaround times
The digital print process has an extremely quick setup time. Jobs can be approved and printing in a matter of minutes or hours as opposed to offset printing which takes time to imposed jobs, produce printing plates and allow for the printing press setup time. It is the answer for urgent projects with short turnaround times.

New Increased Sheet Size
Recent advances in technology allow us to now print on an oversized sheet measuring 330mm x 660mm. This allows us to now digitally print A4 landscape covers, 3 panel A4 portrait brochures and short run presentation folders, to name a few. What would have previously been forced to be offset printed can now be affordably done in low quantities, with the same high quality finish.

Personalised Printing
Variable Data Printing is a form of customisable digital printing. Customised marketing collateral is now easily achievable and often now expected to achieve results. Using information from a database, text and graphics can be changed on each piece without stopping or slowing down the digital press.

Cheaper Low Volume Printing
Digital printing provides lower per unit costs for small print runs. Minimal setup and run costs allow for this.

Envelope Printing
Digitally printed envelopes are now achievable. Perfect for weddings, corporate events and mail-out campaigns. Previously the setup costs of offset printing limited envelope printing to larger runs to be cost effective, now digital print technology makes small envelope print runs viable.

Quality Short Run Books Now Achievable
High-quality, low-quantity books are now achievable through digital printing. Whether they are stapled or perfect bound, small runs of publications can now be produced in a cost-effective way, in a fraction of the time, to the exact quantity you need.

Check out some of the following digital print products we can offer you; business cards, banners, brochures, calendars, flyers, posters, presentation folders, rackcards and stickers to name a few.
If you have any questions about which printing process would best suit your project email us at orders@tph.co.nz or drop us a line at 0800 533 677.

TPH-history-of-print-large

Do you know how printing started? Check out this quick video.

The History of the Printing Press

Johannes Gutenberg revolutionized printing with his invention of mechanical movable type. It wasn’t that long ago that jobs were being printed using this very method… and it’s still a technique used for specialty jobs and covers. At TPH and Caxton, we have moved with the times but the Caxton story started back in the days when setting text the way Johannes developed, was common. It hasn’t been until the last 20 years that technology has changed the face of printing, allowing virtually anyone to set up a publishing house. Today Caxton is one of NZ’s leading printers with a reputation for excellence in print and service, and TPH Print has revolutionised this service by providing small to medium sized businesses with high quality, cost effective print via a proven online system.

Check out the  ’Johannes Gutenberg’ 4 minute story at this link below.

The History of the Printing Press

or watch Stephen Fry’s teaser vid on the story – here.

 

paper microscope

The 50 Cent Punch-out paper Microscope!

If you’re not followers of TEDtalks, then you should be. This article really shows the ability that a little design ingenuity can make, with paper.

Perhaps you’ve punched out a paper doll, folded an origami swan, or maybe you received one of The Production House’s die-cut “Captain Print push-out Competition Cards”? TED Fellow Manu Prakash and his team have created a microscope made of paper (yes, you heard correctly, paper!) that’s just as easy to fold and use. A sparkling demo that shows how this invention could revolutionize healthcare in developing countries … and turn almost anything into a fun, hands-on science experiment.

Makes you start to wonder what device you could design that would help you do your job, or impact your sphere of influence.

 

symbol_post

11 symbols we now take for granted…

If you work at your computer or on your phone as much as we do, you will be more than aware of these common, instantly recognisable symbols and icons that are in front of you countless times a day. But how much do you know about their origins?

power_symbol

POWER. It’s plastered on T-shirts; it tells you which button will start your Prius; it’s even been used on NYC condom wrappers. As far back back as World War II engineers used the binary system to label individual power buttons, toggles and rotary switches: A 1 meant “on,” and a 0 meant off. In 1973, the International Electrotechnical Commission vaguely codified a broken circle with a line inside it as “standby power state,” and sticks to that story even now. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, however, decided that was too vague, and altered the definition to simply mean power. Hell yeah, IEEE. Way to take a stand.

Screenshot 2014-02-03 13.57.46

COMMAND. What do Swedish campgrounds and overuse of the Apple logo have in common? A lot, according to Andy Hertzfeld of the original Mac development team. While working with other team members to translate menu commands directly to the keyboard, Hertzfeld and his team decided to add a special function key. The idea was simple: When pressed in combination with other keys, this “Apple key” would select the corresponding menu command. Jobs hated it — or more precisely the symbol used to represent the button — which was yet another picture of the Apple logo. Hertzfeld recalls his reaction: “There are too many Apples on the screen! It’s ridiculous! We’re taking the Apple logo in vain!” A hasty redesign followed, in which bitmap artist Susan Kare pored through an international symbol dictionary and settled on one floral symbol that, in Sweden, indicated a noteworthy attraction in a campground. Alternately known as the Gorgon loop, the splat, the infinite loop, and, in the Unicode standard, a “place of interest sign,” the command symbol has remained a mainstay on Apple keyboards to this day.

Screenshot 2014-02-03 13.58.10

BLUETOOTH. You’ve probably heard the story of 10th-century Danish King, Harald Blåtand, as it relates to Bluetooth, right? He was renowned connoisseur of blueberries; at least one of this teeth was permanently stained blue; yadda yadda yadda. What you might not know is that the Bluetooth symbol is actually a combination of the two runes that represent Harald’s initials. It just so happens the first Bluetooth receptor also had a “teeth-like” shape, and was — you guessed it — blue. But the symbolic interplay doesn’t end there. As the Bluetooth SIG notes, Blåtand “was instrumental in uniting warring factions in parts of what are now Norway, Sweden, and Denmark — just as Bluetooth technology is designed to allow collaboration between differing industries such as the computing, mobile phone and automotive markets.”

Screenshot 2014-02-03 13.58.27

USB. Created as part of the USB 1.0 spec, the USB icon was drawn to resemble Neptune’s Trident, the mighty Dreizack. (But that doesn’t mean you should go around stabbing people or trying to domesticate dolphins with your flash drive.) In lieu of the pointed triangles at the tip of the three-pronged spear, the USB promoters decided to alter the shapes to a triangle, square and circle. This was done to signify all the different peripherals that could be attached using the standard.

For the other 7 icons visit readymag.com/shuffle/ui-symbols